Collection Development Policy for Philosophy

Objectives: The collection in philosophy is designed to support the learning, teaching, and research needs of the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral programs in philosophy offered by the departments of philosophy of The Claremont Colleges. The collection also supports areas and cross-disciplinary programs related to philosophy, such as classics, religion, literature, politics and public affairs, law, bioethics, science and technology, cognitive science, women's and ethnic studies, leadership studies, early modern studies, and intellectual history.

Programs offered:

B.A. The undergraduate B.A. in philosophy is offered at Claremont McKenna, Harvey-Mudd, Pitzer, Pomona, and Scripps Colleges.

All of the departments of philosophy at the colleges cooperate; Pitzer, Scripps, Harvey-Mudd, Claremont Mckenna, and Claremont Graduate University have formal cooperative programs.

As with other subjects, Harvey Mudd College students may major in philosophy, dual major in philosophy, or fulfill their humanities concentration with four or more classes in philosophy. A major in philosophy at Harvey Mudd College must be achieved with courses at the other colleges.

M.A. The M.A. in Philosophy is offered by the philosophy department in the Centers for the Arts and Humanities at The Claremont Graduate University. Students may concentrate in the history of ancient philosophy, the history of modern philosophy, or contemporary philosophy. These different concentrations have different language requirements. The degree may be a final degree or an interim degree received before acceptance to candidacy for the Ph.D. program.

Accelerated B.A./M.A. and Dual Degrees. Claremont Graduate University offers an accelerated M.A. in philosophy which provides qualified graduates of The Claremont Colleges the opportunity to earn a CGU master's degree in one year. The University also offers dual degrees (e.g., an M.A./M.B.A. in philosophy and management).

Ph.D. The Ph.D. in Philosophy is offered by the philosophy department in the Centers for the Arts and Humanities at The Claremont Graduate University. In addition to the required course work, a folio (consisting of three 4,000 to 5,000 word papers), a dissertation prospectus, and an oral examination must be successfully completed before a candidate begins the dissertation. The dissertation is, as usual, followed by a defense. Candidates must also demonstrate reading proficiency in two different languages.

Subjects and collecting levels: The acquisition of primary texts is the main priority of the subject specialist in philosophy. Reference materials, secondary monographs about major philosophers, and periodicals should be acquired to support all basic philosophical areas. All acquisitions are budget-permitting.

The library should also purchase interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and theoretical materials to complement thematic and specialized courses offered by the graduate and undergraduate faculty, including works dealing with classical studies, religion, literature, politics and public affairs, law, bioethics, science and technology, cognitive science, women's and ethnic studies, leadership studies, early modern studies, and intellectual history. Moreover, because of the interdisciplinary character of current philosophical methods and interests, the philosophy fund should be used in conjunction with other funds to purchase important publications in other subjects that are relevant to philosophy.

Types of materials collected: Monographs, collections of essays, journals, reference tools, and electronic journals are the main forms of materials collected by the Library. Electronic primary texts (such as those available from Past Masters) are helpful because they serve remote users as well as in their function as virtual concordances. Major electronic indexes in philosophy should be supported since they are, taken together with the online catalog and union catalogs, the primary tools for access. As funds permit, relevant microforms, videos, and other primary research and classroom aids that correlate with the curricular and research interests of faculty will be considered.

Languages: Primary works of philosophy should, when possible, be available in the original language and in English. Secondary works, books, and other published materials in other languages will be purchased in accordance with the research and curricular needs of the faulty.

Geographical emphasis: No geographical area is excluded.

Chronological limits: None.

Last updated: 5/23/2012 3:04:57 PM